Drug and alcohol treatment is a significant portion of all healthcare spending.
True
False
Most addicts require inpatient treatment.
True
False
Treatment isn’t usually successful for those with a serious addiction.
True
False
Only 10% of those who need treatment for addiction to drugs or alcohol are able to get it.
True
False
Treating addiction is not like treating an upset stomach. When people try to kick addiction and fail, it is a matter of will, not a matter of medicine.
True
False
Screening and brief intervention for emergency room patients is too costly and would bankrupt most county hospitals.
True
False
Most people who use drugs are out of work or unemployable.
True
False
Your son is admitted to the hospital for the third time this year as a result of an injury caused by over consumption of alcohol. As a matter of procedure the hospital will screen him for a substance abuse problem?
True
False
Funding for substance abuse treatment in Texas has increased over time.
True
False
Stigma plays a significant role in our state’s ability to effectively deal with the public health crisis of drug and alcohol addiction.
True
False
People don’t need treatment. They can just go to AA or NA.
True
False
The addict has to want help or treatment won’t work.
True
False
A portion of the Texas state alcohol taxes go toward treatment programs.
True
False
Drug, Alcohol & Suicide Deaths Could Rise 60% in the Next Decade
About 1.6 million Americans could die from drugs, alcohol and suicide in the next decade, according to a comprehensive new report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Well Being Trust. The figure is a 60 percent increase over the past decade and the authors say the projections could be conservative as the opioid epidemic continues to wreak havoc on American communities. The report includes an online interactive tool that maps trends and also includes an analysis of  the economic impact of drug, alcohol and suicide-related health costs which total $249 billion a year – 9.5 percent of total U.S. health expenditures. The report advocates for the creation of a “National Resilience Strategy” to reduce suicide:

 

  • ATTACK THE CRISES:  Expand and scale up evidence-based efforts to deploy a full-scale strategy against opioids, excessive alcohol use, and rising suicide rates.
  • BOLSTER SUPPORTS: Prioritize prevention, reduce risk factors and promote resilience in children, families and communities.
  • IDENTIFY EARLY: Enhance programs that identify early warning signs, and connect people to the services they need.
  • ENHANCE TREATMENT:  Improve pain management and treatment, and modernize mental health and substance abuse services, to focus on individuals’ whole health.